Chromatic aberration

Chromatic aberration becomes visible at macro photos on the edges of picture when the picture is magnified. The level of chromatic aberration depends of quality of lens. Good original lenses have very small chromatic aberration but raises when add-lenses or some other way of picture optical magnifying is used. The best way to avoid chromatic aberration is the use of macro extension tube which in our case can't be used. This section of picture below shows the chromatic aberration as blue fringe on right edge of petal. Purple fringe is not visible because it is covered with a red flower's color.

 

Note that the shape and intensity of aberrations depends a little bit of source of light, or better, of direction of illumination. In third row in table on left side three samples of the same subject are shown. You can open large picture with click on the picture as follows: subject illuminated from the left, from bottom and from right side.

In last row the intensity of chromatic aberration depending of magnification is showed. When compared, the best appears to be the using of reverse 50 mm standard lens fixed on a 200 mm objective. Left picture was taken at 200 mm macro, middle with 2x add-lens mounted on 200 mm macro, and third, with reverse 50 mm lens fixed on 200 mm macro. At 50 mm reversed lens almost no chromatic aberration is visible, but still reaches the magnification of 3:1!

 

Picture data:

Magnified

20 x

Resample process

Stretch/truncate

Compression

30 steps (Photopaint)

Original image data:

Type

fine JPEG

Resolution

2560*1800

File size

1262 KB

Image size/72dpi

903 x 677 mm

Compression

3 steps (Minolta)

Focus

200 mm

Aperture

9,5

Shutter time

1/30 sec

ISO

800

WB

sun

Color

0

Intensity

0

Contrast

0

Sharpness

Normal